Parenting With Type 1 Diabetes

Parenting with Type 1 Diabetes | The LOOP Blog

I can’t believe that it has already been a year since I first posted about my thoughts of becoming a father with type 1 diabetes. At that time I had a lot of fears of the unknown, a year later there are still a lot of unknowns that create fear and stress.

There is still not a day that goes by that I don’t think about the possibility of my daughter being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. I can’t allow myself to get hung up on those thoughts every day or else I will be living in fear every day of my life and not enjoying the little special moments that happen every day.

While my wife and I were awaiting our daughter’s entrance into this world, I began to realize how much more important my own health was as well. I knew that I needed to be here on this earth for my daughter for as long as I possibly could be. With that being said, I took on changes in my life to try and be a much healthier person. This included eating better, exercising more, cutting out energy drinks that keep me going all night long and trying to remove as much stress from my life as possible.

I also decided that I was going to use the technology that I am so lucky to have access to more often. At times, I would become lazy and say to myself, “I don’t feel like inserting a new sensor.” This was just another excuse that was keeping me from being as healthy as I could. I knew that using my CGM would also help me with predicting any upcoming lows that I have always worried would cause me to cut play time with my daughter shorter.

But, of course, having a newborn was going to bring on its own form of stress!

Throughout this first year of having a child, there were only a few instances where I had to take a break from playing with my daughter to go and grab a juice to bring up my blood sugar levels. I must admit, it is a pretty funny sight to see when a grown man is the one drinking a juice box instead of his 11 month old daughter.

One thing that has really helped me through this first year is the amount of advice and support I received from other fathers who have type 1 diabetes. The community of people with diabetes and their caregivers is unlike anything I’ve ever seen. I wish that my community of Philadelphia Eagles fans was always this supportive!

I have received a lot of questions about what have we decided to feed our child, did we or do we still breastfeed, what research should we read, etc. My number one piece of advice is to just always do what you feel is best for your child and enjoy every single day and every moment of the day because the longer you are researching the next study, the more you are missing out on the cute thing your child just did for the first time.

We not only speak with our pediatrician about introducing certain foods, but I also ask my endocrinologist and diabetes educator for general feedback.

Becoming a dad has been the most rewarding thing that I have done in my life. We take every day as it comes, even though there is always that thought in the back of my mind, I do not let it stop me from enjoying every day.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

MiniMed 530G with Enlite system is intended for the delivery of insulin and continuous glucose monitoring for the management of diabetes mellitus by persons 16 years of age or older who require insulin. Insulin infusion pumps and associated components of insulin infusion systems are limited to sale by or on the order of a physician and should only be used under the direction of a healthcare professional familiar with the risks of insulin pump therapy. The Enlite sensor is not approved for use in children or adolescents younger than 16 years, pregnant women, or persons on dialysis.

The information provided by CGM systems is intended to supplement, not replace, blood glucose information obtained using a home glucose meter. A confirmatory fingerstick is required prior to making adjustments to diabetes therapy. MiniMed 530G with Enlite is not intended to be used directly for preventing or treating hypoglycemia but to suspend insulin delivery when the user is unable to respond to the Threshold Suspend alarm and take measures to prevent or treat hypoglycemia themselves. Therapy to prevent or treat hypoglycemia should be administered according to the recommendations of the user’s Health Care Provider.

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