A Finger Prickin Good Diabetes Story

A Finger Prickin Good Diabetes Story | The LOOP Blog

Today, I’m happy to introduce you to Brooke Wheeler. Brooke is the mom of an adorable little boy named Carson, who lives with type 1 diabetes. Read their diagnosis story and be sure to check out her website to learn how she is giving back to the diabetes communitywith creative recipes like “Yogurt & Granola Fruit Kabobs” and an emphasis on help others lead a healthy lifestyle.

Hi, my name is Brooke Wheeler. I am a wife, mother, and type 3 diabetic. Ok, ok, I know there isn’t actually a type 3, but don’t you think that would be a good classification for parents and caregivers of diabetics?

My connection to diabetes is because of my 6 year old son, Carson, who was diagnosed with diabetes when he was just 21 months old. His diagnosis came as a complete shock to my husband and me. We knew very little about diabetes, and certainly didn’t know anything about diabetes management or the technology surrounding it.

However, after his diagnosis we tried to learn everything we could about this disease and the different options for managing it. The first time we ever heard about an insulin pump was when we were still in the hospital, following his diagnosis. At that time, we were told Carson would likely not be a good candidate for a pump until he was at least 3.

It took very few times of giving 4 injections a day before my husband and I really questioned why on earth he wouldn’t be a good candidate for an insulin pump. In our minds a growing, active, inconsistent eating toddler would be one of the best candidates for insulin pump therapy.

Long story short, we got connected with an endocrinologist who was all for getting Carson on an insulin pump. About 3 months after his diagnosis, our prayers were answered. Carson was on an insulin pump, and it was absolutely life changing!

While the pump has certainly made life easier, and given us much better control over Carson’s diabetes management, the past (almost) 5 years have definitely been full of ups and downs (both figuratively and literally), as we as a family help Carson navigate through life with diabetes.

While I am always conscious of the fact that Carson’s struggle is far greater than my own, it doesn’t diminish the fact that this disease is really hard on the parents connected to the disease as well. Especially because Carson was so young when he was diagnosed, I feel my husband and I really took on the burdens of this disease, as Carson was (and in many ways, still is) too young to understand it all himself.

At times I have really struggled under the weight of this disease. For years really, I’ve felt very fragile as a caretaker…like I wasn’t equipped to handle this disease and the challenges it brings. However, with each passing year, and lately even months, I feel like my shoulders get a little broader, and my skin a little thicker.

I wanted to do something positive with this new found confidence and energy I had found, and possibly offer a helping hand to others who are trying to “find their way” in life with diabetes.

My ultimate conclusion was that I wanted to do anything I could to help other families who are affected by diabetes – whether it’s those families dealing with a new diagnosis or those who are seasoned veterans but still struggle with one of the biggest aspects of the disease: FOOD! To do that, I created a space where I share recipes of the food I make for Carson, always complete with carb counts.

Today, I am sharing one such recipe with you. It is a recipe for Yogurt & Granola Fruit Kabobs (pictured above and available to read here) and can be eaten for breakfast, a snack, or even packed in a lunch. It’s easy to make, bite-sized (which kids love) and nutritious and delicious!

Editor’s Note: To see this and other recipes, visit fingerprickingood.com.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

– Medtronic Diabetes insulin infusion pumps, continuous glucose monitoring systems and associated components are limited to sale by or on the order of a physician and should only be used under the direction of a healthcare professional familiar with the risks associated with the use of these systems.
– Successful operation of the insulin infusion pumps and/or continuous glucose monitoring systems requires adequate vision and hearing to recognize alerts and alarms.

Medtronic Diabetes Insulin Infusion Pumps

– Insulin pump therapy is not recommended for individuals who are unable or unwilling to perform a minimum of four blood glucose tests per day.
– Insulin pumps use rapid-acting insulin. If your insulin delivery is interrupted for any reason, you must be prepared to replace the missed insulin immediately.

For more information, please visit MedtronicDiabetes.com/isi.

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